How to Crochet a Beanie

How to Crochet Baby Beanie – http://crochet.about.com/od/hats/a/how-to-crochet-a-baby-beanie.htm

Erica Jackofsky, aka Fiddle Knits, is a knit and crochet designer based out of eastern Long Island.

About Fiddle Knits

She enjoys creating designs ranging from hats to sweaters that pair clean, simple shapes with beautiful details and accents. To browse all of Erica’s designs on About.com you can visit her Crochet Patterns page. Experience Erica began her designing career focused exclusively on knitted accessories. Recently she has taken it back to her roots and included crochet in an effort to make her patterns more widely accessible. She also self publishes on her web site, FiddleKnits.com. Erica has been an active part of Knit Picks Independent Designer Program since it launched in late 2009. This program is dedicated to bringing knitters and crocheters affordable materials while supporting the Indie arts community.

Erica Jackofsky Creating new designs is hands down my greatest passion. I love the anticipation and opportunity contained within a skein of yarn. My thrill in beginning a new project is topped only by the enjoyment I get from sharing the pattern for that project with the crafting community. As a contributing writer for About.com, I am looking forward to sharing my passion for crocheted designs with you. I hope that you visit the crochet pages of About.com often and find plenty of patterns, stitches, and inspiration to fuel your own passion for the craft. References: • Original designs by Erica Jackofsky Beanies are classic, never go out of style, and are a perfect choice to keep your baby warm. This pattern recipe will have you crocheting baby beanies in no time with whatever yarn and hook you have on hand.

Skill Level: Easy Step 1: Choose Your Materials Yarn: Your choice of yarn.

For my baby beanie I chose Lion Brand, Baby’s First, a bulky weight cotton and acrylic yarn blend. If you’re unsure what the best material for your hat is then you might be interested in reading the Yarn for Baby Hats article before beginning. Yardage: How much yardage, or how many grams, of yarn you use is going to vary. The weight of your yarn (DK, worsted, bulky, etc.) and the fiber will all impact how much you need. To give you a general guide I’ve provided approximate yardage for a baby beanie using worsted weight. Do remember, however, that this is a guide only and your results may be different. Preemie Beanie: 30 to 50 yards Newborn Beanie: 50 to 70 yards

Baby Beanie: 60 to 80 yards

Bean Crochet Hook: This crochet baby beanie is a “no gauge” project.Choose a crochet hook that works well with your yarn. If you’re not sure, check the yarn label. Large manufacturers will print the recommended hook size near the care instructions on every yarn wrapper. For the sample beanie I used a size J/6mm crochet hook paired with my bulky weight yarn.

Extras: Measuring tape Tapestry needle for sewing hat together and weaving in ends

Step 2. Choose your finished size!

Special Techniques: Crocheting in the round Step 2: Choose Your Finished Size The next step after choosing your materials is deciding what size you want your finished hat to be. If the hat recipient is handy then use a measuring tape to determine forehead circumference. If this isn’t possible you may wish to refer to the baby hat size chart. Write down your desired finished hat circumference. You’ll need to know this measurement during the next step. The sample beanie measures 13.25” forehead circumference. Step 3: Begin Crocheting Note that all beanie hats will begin the same no matter what finished size you’re making. Chain 4, slip stitch to the first chain to form a ring.

Step 3. Start Creating!

Foundation Round: Chain 1 (counts as 1st single crochet), work 7 single crochet into the center of the ring — 8 single crochet total. Round 1: Chain 1 and single crochet in same stitch (this counts as 2 single crochet in the 1st stitch), work 2 single crochet in each stitch around, slip stitch to beginning chain to join round — 16 single crochet. Round 2: Chain 1 and single crochet in same stitch (this counts as 2 single crochet in the 1st stitch), 1 single crochet in next stitch, *2 single crochet in next stitch (increases stitch count by 1), 1 single crochet in next stitch; repeat from * to end, slip stitch in beginning chain to join — 24 single crochet. Round 3: Chain 1 and single crochet in same stitch (this counts as 2 single crochet in the 1st stitch), 1 single crochet in next 2 stitches, *2 single crochet in next stitch (increases stitch count by 1), 1 single crochet in next 2 stitches; repeat from * to end, slip stitch in beginning chain to join — 32 single crochet. Continue in this manner, working 1 more stitch between increases on each round, until hat is desired circumference.

For example, round 4 would be: Chain 1 and single crochet in same stitch (this counts as 2 single crochet in the 1st stitch), 1 single crochet in next 3 stitches, *2 single crochet in next stitch (increases stitch count by 1), 1 single crochet in next 3 stitches; repeat from * to end, slip stitch in beginning chain to join — 40 single crochet.

To check and see if beanie is desired circumference you may use either of the following methods. 1. Lay crochet piece on a flat surface. Use a flexible measuring tape to measure around the outer edge of the circle. 2. Use a ruler to measure how many stitches are in 1 inch. Count the number of stitches in your round and divide it by the number of stitches you have in 1 inch. The number you end up with is your circumference. For example, if I’ve counted 3 stitches per inch and have 40 stitches in my round then I know the circumference of my beanie is 13.25 inches. Work Even Once you’ve increased to your desired stitch count, continue to single crochet each round until beanie reaches the right length. If your hat recipient is handy then simply place the hat on their head to check length. If not, you may refer to the Baby Hat Size Chart for standard length measurements.